"The “Terminator” franchise proposes a future in which humans are fighting against Sky Lab, an Artificial Intelligence. At least that’s what the humans think they are fighting. An alternative way to think about this future, is that there is no Artificial Intelligence. Instead, the elites have separated themselves from the proletariat and have begun a genocidal war against them using killer drones. Which future is more likely? A menacing singularity or a group of resistance fighters being hunted down by drones from an unknown enemy? I imagine that it must feel a lot like the latter in Afghanistan. Polls show that 92% of Afghans have never heard of 9/11. They are presently fighting a war with no history, and no future."

Talking at the Movies: Drones

"Polls show that 92% of Afghans have never heard of 9/11. They are presently fighting a war with no history, and no future."

Wow. Just wow.

Really great blog, glad I followed over to have a root around.

(via actuallyexistingbarbarism)

This was a reason why I distrusted transhumanists. Now, I’m realizing, to my horror, that for some, the Singularity is here.

(via tariqk)

(via grub-boy)

How to Be an Inclusive Comic Book Store

nicksmedulla:

So, with all this discussion about how alienating comic book stores can be, here is a super anecdotal, but I think useful, list of ways stores can be more inclusive. Some of these can serve as signs of a welcoming environment for otherwise wary customers and others as advice for people who work behind the counter.

1. You’re a store, not a private club-house

This is one that boggles my mind the most about the gatekeeper culture. We’re businesses, we should be constantly working to expand our customer base. More customers means more business, and it’s not like we’re selling a high profit margin product.

2. Customers come first

When someone walks in the door, great them with a “Hello, how are you?” and some variation on “Let me know if you have any questions!” I can’t go 2 minutes in Best Buy without someone asking if they can help me find anything and comic book stores shouldn’t be any different.

3. Don’t assume why someone is there

Ask them what brought them in today. It’s a great way to start a conversation and makes it easier for you to help them find something to buy. The couple that just walked in, maybe the girl is introducing her boyfriend to comics for the first time. Maybe the guy in the Batman t-shirt has never read a comic book in his life and leaves happily with a subscription to Captain Marvel, Hawkeye and Young Avengers. (Both of these obviously are actual things that happened in my store)

4. If it’s popular online, it’s going to sell

Is a new comic generating a lot of buzz? Take a risk and buy some extra copies for the shelf and put it somewhere easy to spot. A recent example is Ms. Marvel. We bought nearly as many copies of it as our best-selling Marvel title and still sold out of it in the first two days.

5. Keep your store clean

There should not be so many people who feel the need to comment on how clean the store I work at is. This is kind of a Retail 101 thing. Once again, this isn’t your private space, make it welcoming.

6. Be willing to change

The comic book industry is (slowly) changing and stores shouldn’t have problems keeping up. There are comics to be found beyond the Big Two, with companies like Image and Boom are putting out new awesome and innovative books every month. If you walk into a store and you don’t see award winning (and lucrative) books like Saga on a recommendation rack, take that as a warning sign.

If you’re nervous, go with a friend. If you do/don’t feel welcome, make sure other people know using awesome resources like http://haterfreewednesdays.tumblr.com/. Comics should be for everyone!

(via quackenbuschlight)

these are actually nice

  • 1. selfie
  • 2. what would you name your future kids?
  • 3. do you miss anyone?
  • 4. what are you looking forward to?
  • 5. is there anyone who can always make you smile?
  • 6. is it hard for you to get over someone?
  • 7. what was your life like last year?
  • 8. have you ever cried because you were so annoyed?
  • 9. who did you last see in person?
  • 10. are you good at hiding your feelings?
  • 11. are you listening to music right now?
  • 12. what is something you want right now?
  • 13. how do you feel right now?
  • 14. when was the last time someone of the opposite sex hugged you?
  • 15. personality description
  • 16. have you ever wanted to tell someone something but you didn't?
  • 17. opinion on insecurities.
  • 18. do you miss how thing were a year ago?
  • 19. have you ever been to New York?
  • 20. what is your favourite song at the moment?
  • 21. age and birthday?
  • 22. description of crush.
  • 23. fear(s)
  • 24. height
  • 25. role model
  • 26. idol(s)
  • 27. things i hate
  • 28. i'll love you if...
  • 29. favourite film(s)
  • 30. favourite tv show(s)
  • 31. 3 random facts
  • 32. are your friends mainly girls or guys?
  • 33. something you want to learn
  • 34. most embarrassing moment
  • 35. favourite subject
  • 36. 3 dreams you want to fulfill?
  • 37. favourite actor/actress
  • 38. favourite comedian(s)
  • 39. favourite sport(s)
  • 40. favourite memory
  • 41. relationship status
  • 42. favourite book(s)
  • 43. favourite song ever
  • 44. age you get mistaken for
  • 45. how you found out about your idol
  • 46. what my last text message says
  • 47. turn ons
  • 48. turn offs
  • 49. where i want to be right now
  • 50. favourite picture of your idol
  • 51. starsign
  • 52. something i'm talented at
  • 53. 5 things that make me happy
  • 54. something thats worrying me at the moment
  • 55. tumblr friends
  • 56. favourite food(s)
  • 57. favourite animal(s)
  • 58. description of my best friend
  • 59. why i joined tumblr
  • 60. ask me anything you want

total-queer-move:

LOOK. IT’S EVERY SINGLE STEREOTYPE ABOUT MEN’S RIGHTS ACTIVISTS PUT INTO ONE HANDY-DANDY DEMOGRAPHICS SURVEY SO IT CAN BE STATISTICALLY VALIDATED!! [x]

THANKS R/MENSRIGHTS!!

(via rebelpachelbel)

  • Parent to child at the library: Shhh...remember what we said about being loud in the library?
  • Child: We'll wake up the books.
  • Parent: That's right.

regarding trolling

dotcommunism:

as my understanding has it, i make no assumption that my understanding or my experiences or anything of the sort are universal, “trolling” in a traditional sense mostly refers to people making bad faith arguments, often with the desire of eliciting a certain reaction. often times, of course, the purpose of such arguments was solely to annoy someone, but on rare occassions it could be used to expose some sort of flaw in an argument or viewpoint

more recently, however, the working definition of “trolling” has come to include things like harrassment and death threats and other such behavior. the purpose thereof, as i can tell, is to diminish the seriousness of such acts by equating them with a rather “juveline” contrariness and reducing a desire to threaten and intimidate simply to a desire to annoy. this of course serves to reinforce the power of dominant groups by letting them write off their acts of enforcing their own positions of power and privilege, through such acts as harassment and threats, as mere acts of “trolling”. the redefinition of “trolling” then serves to diminish the severity of acts committed in the defense of power

there is another redefinition of “trolling”, however, that is in action and it, fundamentally, serves the same purpose albeit in a different, and seemingly contradictory, way. this is the act of journalists and other people who have public platforms to characterize any sort of criticism of them as an act of “trolling”. see someone like jeremy scahill characterizing anyone who dares to criticize him as a “troll” (https://twitter.com/jeremyscahill/statuses/402543084481044480). this is how the journalist, and really it is not limited to them it comes from anyone who is in a position of power, uses the label of “troll” to dismiss any criticism without ever having to address it or acknowledge any merits that it may or may not have. in this case, as in the other, the conflation of “trolling” with harassment and abuse serves the interests of power, although for seemingly different reasons. in this case, it is not to diminish actual abuse, in this case it is to simultaneously dismiss legitimate criticism by not only framing it as a bad faith argument (the “traditional” definition of trolling, as such) but to also implicitly connect the act of criticism with abuse and harassment. in this sense, the idea of invoking “trolling” is not to diminish abuse but to amplify or manufacture it.

the conflation of “trolling” with abuse and harassment, then, not only serves the interests of those who are able to commit abuse relatively freely (by allowing them to dismiss the seriousness of what they do) but also those who seek to characterize any legitimate criticism as abuse (by allowing them to invoke the manufactured association between “trolling” and abuse). this conflation functions in diminishing abuse but also, due to conflating abuse with “trolling” as in the traditional sense as put forth, associates any sort of criticism, with the bad faith accusations involved with “traditional” trolling taken into account, with harassment and abuse, therefore making anyone who dares speak out against anyone who has a public platform inherently abusive

we then arrive at a point where the conflation of “trolling” with harassment serves the interests of power in multiple, seemingly contradictory ways. on one hand, it allows those in positions of power to diminish their own abuse and harassment as mere acts of “trolling” but on the other hand it perverts the legitimate criticisms of those in power by associating them with “trolling”, and in turn, with the very harassment and abuse that power seeks to diminish

stalungrad:

Ash has met a Zorua for the first time.

"Isn’t Zorua a really rare Pokémon?" asks Iris.

Cilan confirms this. “This is the first time I’ve ever seen one.”

You don’t know that, Cilan. Maybe everything you’ve ever seen is a Zorua.

(Source: cresidda, via spektrmodule)

(via felrender)

philsandifer:

pointless-letters:

An insight into the strangely unanimous world of the Daily / Sunday Express poll.

If someone ever finds a “Being John Malkovich” style hatch into Nigel Farage’s head, I swear this will be what the wallpaper looks like in there.

I really love the 1% here. I mean, there can’t be that many people who answer the phone poll. There’s just some small, like, dozen people who buy the Daily/Sunday Express and call into the phone poll every day to say “no, no, let’s not teach the bragging yob a lesson, that’s terribly classist and wrong.” These people cannot be pleased with the paper they are buying. They must just be flipping through page after page, cringing and thinking “God, this paper is written by and for awful people.” Before dutifully calling in and lodging their protest. 

I wonder if, once, they opened their paper and saw “Yes: 98%” and just collapsed from the sheer joy of it. “We’re making a difference, Martha! We’re moving the Overton Window!”

sebpatrick:

antiocial:

And yet this is still better detective work than he does in any of the Burton, Schumacher or Nolan films.

(Source: iraffiruse, via deathchrist2000)

fearofaghostplanet:

I want this on a shirt. I want this on my skin.

fearofaghostplanet:

I want this on a shirt. I want this on my skin.

(Source: total-queer-move, via spektrmodule)

timrobinson:

100 Wrestling Masks

timrobinson:

100 Wrestling Masks

shitloadsofwrestling:

"Shocked Undertaker Guy" speaks to WWE.com [2014]
In a moment of sheer WWE.com awesomeness, they tracked down Ellis Mbeh, a.k.a. “Shocked Undertaker Guy”, and got an interview with him. The full interview is here, but these are my favorite moments of the interview:

WWE.COM: You became the unofficial face of 21-1 at the end of The Undertaker match. What was going through your mind at that moment?
ELLIS MBEH: I was actually rooting for Brock Lesnar! For the past few years I’ve been rooting [against The Streak]. I rooted for Triple H, who is my favorite wrestler … I rooted for CM Punk. But I never expected [any of them would win]. I knew Undertaker would win. Somehow, someway, Undertaker always wins. So with Brock, in my head I didn’t think it would actually happen, you know? When it happened, my mind was stopped. It was like, “Oh my God, what happened … I just witnessed history.”

This part, however, made me tear up pretty hardcore.

WWE.COM: You’ve been to two WrestleManias. What were some of the highlights of your experiences?
MBEH: Last year was all about meeting Triple H. His [book, “Building a Better Game”] was the first one I actually read outside of school. It gave me confidence that I could work out. At one point I weighed 375 pounds, and that was in 2010, 2011. Something happened with me in a hospital I couldn’t explain; my blood pressure was really high … I took what I learned from Triple H and just committed myself. Every day I just went to the gym, worked out for hours with what I saw in the book and I just stayed determined. I know for a fact that if I’d never read his book I would not be here.
WWE.COM: What happened when you met him?
MBEH: Someone told me I only had 30 seconds, so I go “OK. I’ll just say what I have to say real quick, show him [my before and after picture] and that’s it.” I’d never been to Axxess before, never been to WrestleMania before.
I get in line and I’m third in line, my wife is right behind me, and the two guys in front of me just walk away. I guess they were going to see other Superstars. So out of nowhere, I was first and I’m crapping my pants. All the planning I had about 30 seconds ago is gone. I see him and he’s like, “How you doin,’ man?” and I go, “Um, I’m good.” He signed my title belt and I said, “I just want to thank you for saving my life,” and I just started crying. I just kept on talking and he just stopped and looked at me and I told him everything.
Like, who in the world gets to [meet] the person who saved their life, you know? People don’t get that moment. And he just listened to everything I said and he said, “I’m proud of you. You say you look up to me, but I’m proud of you.” Just hearing that made me feel like I did something right. He got the camera crew, we did an interview, he told me he was proud of me, he hugged me and that was it, but it meant a lot to me.

That jerked the tears right out of my face. Shocked Undertaker Guy rules in so many ways. It’s awesome that someone who has so much love for the WWE and its performers was part of an immortal moment of television history.

shitloadsofwrestling:

"Shocked Undertaker Guy" speaks to WWE.com [2014]

In a moment of sheer WWE.com awesomeness, they tracked down Ellis Mbeh, a.k.a. “Shocked Undertaker Guy”, and got an interview with him. The full interview is here, but these are my favorite moments of the interview:

WWE.COM: You became the unofficial face of 21-1 at the end of The Undertaker match. What was going through your mind at that moment?

ELLIS MBEH: I was actually rooting for Brock Lesnar! For the past few years I’ve been rooting [against The Streak]. I rooted for Triple H, who is my favorite wrestler … I rooted for CM Punk. But I never expected [any of them would win]. I knew Undertaker would win. Somehow, someway, Undertaker always wins. So with Brock, in my head I didn’t think it would actually happen, you know? When it happened, my mind was stopped. It was like, “Oh my God, what happened … I just witnessed history.”

This part, however, made me tear up pretty hardcore.

WWE.COM: You’ve been to two WrestleManias. What were some of the highlights of your experiences?

MBEH: Last year was all about meeting Triple H. His [book, “Building a Better Game”] was the first one I actually read outside of school. It gave me confidence that I could work out. At one point I weighed 375 pounds, and that was in 2010, 2011. Something happened with me in a hospital I couldn’t explain; my blood pressure was really high … I took what I learned from Triple H and just committed myself. Every day I just went to the gym, worked out for hours with what I saw in the book and I just stayed determined. I know for a fact that if I’d never read his book I would not be here.

WWE.COM: What happened when you met him?

MBEH: Someone told me I only had 30 seconds, so I go “OK. I’ll just say what I have to say real quick, show him [my before and after picture] and that’s it.” I’d never been to Axxess before, never been to WrestleMania before.

I get in line and I’m third in line, my wife is right behind me, and the two guys in front of me just walk away. I guess they were going to see other Superstars. So out of nowhere, I was first and I’m crapping my pants. All the planning I had about 30 seconds ago is gone. I see him and he’s like, “How you doin,’ man?” and I go, “Um, I’m good.” He signed my title belt and I said, “I just want to thank you for saving my life,” and I just started crying. I just kept on talking and he just stopped and looked at me and I told him everything.

Like, who in the world gets to [meet] the person who saved their life, you know? People don’t get that moment. And he just listened to everything I said and he said, “I’m proud of you. You say you look up to me, but I’m proud of you.” Just hearing that made me feel like I did something right. He got the camera crew, we did an interview, he told me he was proud of me, he hugged me and that was it, but it meant a lot to me.

That jerked the tears right out of my face. Shocked Undertaker Guy rules in so many ways. It’s awesome that someone who has so much love for the WWE and its performers was part of an immortal moment of television history.

(via twentypercentcooler)